• Cosimo Orban

Week in Review: November 22nd to 27th – Collaborations Driving 3D

Hi and welcome to another Week-in-Review!

This week there is a treasure trove of evidence that partnerships and collaborations really do make a difference and show a rapidly maturing industry. This week’s examples go full spectrum: Renishaw and Dassault bang brains together trying to solve AM design and optimization issues, a collaboration between Auburn U and Nasa seeks to push the limits of space exploration even further through AM creating and another collaboration has designed and printed the best golf driver in the world.

Want to hear more? Here you go.

Renishaw and Dassault Systèmes pool expertise for the integrated AM experience


Renishaw is collaborating with Dassault Systèmes, a world leading 3D modelling, simulation and industrial operations software provider, as part of its commitment to provide and enhance software for metal additive manufacturing (AM). “The 3DExperience platform coupled with QuantAM enables parts to be produced accurately from the outset, which is of tangible time and cost benefit to users. It marks the beginning of many enhancements we have in the pipeline to improve the AM user experience and streamline the front-end of the manufacturing process” explained Stephen Anderson, Renishaw’s Director of Group Software.

Read more here.

Auburn University and NASA sign Space Act Agreement on additive manufacturing

John Mason, Auburn’s vice president for research and economic development, recently signed a Space Act Agreement with Patrick Scheuermann, director of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville to explore additive manufacturing applications using metals, polymers and ceramics. “Great partnerships like this will help us get to places where we’ve never been before,” Scheuermann says. “We can make rockets like our predecessors did . . . but it’s really important to infuse additive manufacturing so that the Space Launch System is affordable and sustainable for decades to come.”

Read the full article here.

Subtractive and additive manufacturing combined to craft world’s most advanced golf driver


Race car manufacturer, CRP Group and golfing manufacturer, Krone Golf have combined additive manufacturing and subtractive manufacturing techniques to craft what they believe is the world’s most advanced golf driver. The KD-1 is the first Windform SP 3D-printed driver clubhead with CNC machined titanium hitting surface. It is a composite driver clubhead where the different materials have a specific function and structural competence.

Read more about the driver here.

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#AuburnUniversity #JohnMason #NASA #Software #CRPGroup #QuantAM #PatrickScheuermann #3DExperience #KroneGolf #StephenAnderson #CNC #Dassault #WindformSP #Renishaw

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